After I Tripped; Medical Specialists Madness (Friday Series #5)

I spent the next few years seeing every specialist my doctor could think of. Neurologists, rheumatologists, anesthesiologists, and one chiropractor. I saw physical therapists,  acupuncturists, and ‘healers,’ the laying of hands type. My doctor enrolled me in a pain clinic. I continued pool therapy and massage therapy. I started going to a psychologist who then requested I meet with a psychiatrist as well, I did. I followed every recommendation. I went to every appointment.

I wanted to be cured!!!

“B” decided we needed a lawyer. John W. was one heck of an attorney! He was very soft-spoken, and he was wise. John became my friend as he guided me through the legal process. I was ordered to see the insurance company’s medical specialists, and I did so without hesitation. (Who knew? They were ‘specialists.’ Maybe they could tell me what was wrong with me!) John handled the collection of all my medical records, and short and long-term disability payments through my employer. John went before the judge and fought for me. John would call me weekly, just to check on me. He was and still is a great man.

With all of the above going on, I was still trying to work! I’d be at work for two or three days one week, put in a week, then out for a week or two. I was utterly exhausted. I was in pain. I was all over the map! I needed help from “B,” but he was not able to help even himself. He had his second back surgery, and I don’t think he ever really recovered. He had become an agitated, angry person.

And still, I had no diagnosis to explain the chronic nature of my pain.

I did end up with an array of ‘secondary’ diagnoses due to the car accident. Ready? It still is so unbelievable to me. Chronic pain, chronic fatigue, restless leg syndrome, closed head injury, concussion, post-concussion headaches, movement disorder, lower back disc displacement, a fractured pelvis, severe whiplash, clinical depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder.

I was imploding.

I was going to get fired.

(To be continued…)

IMG_0462~Kim

24 comments

  1. Oh my goodness, how familiar a lot of this sounds. It is insane the number of specialists it takes to get a diagnosis (or not get one). It’s absolutely exhausting, and sadly I think the patient spends more time researching what could be wrong than the doctors do. I think it took a little over 3 years to finally get a diagnosis. I’m glad that more doctors are finally starting to be educated about fibro, but there’s still a long way to go. At least now, it’s finally a recognized disease.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. So true! I can’t even begin to tell you the amont of money I spent searching for answers! ANY answers. I always was notified of what I did NOT have… the secondary diagnosises were piling up! It was an incredible frustrating time. It tool me 3 years as well to be diagnosed. I’m sure this is all VERY familiar to you.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I am so sorry. You know what a desperate time this is, obviously. It is hard to write but the support I receive from fellow bloggers is unlike any I’ve had before. I’m ready to listen to your story Bojana. When you feel the time is right I’ll listen, promise. 💜

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes B, I think you meant, was not in good shape. He was definitely broken at this point and just checked out of reality. I tried my hardest to keep going… without the the lawyer, John, checking in on me I’d have gone crazy. I just talked to him a month ago! Still the same sweet guy. Caz, it was sink or swim and I couldn’t swim any longer. I was drowning!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Sorry, yes I meant B for the first part about not being in good shape. It’s lovely you can keep in touch with John, I’m not sure how old he is but is he still a practicing lawyer? I think most people would have drowned well before the point you got to, Kim.xx

        Liked by 1 person

        1. John is still a lawyer! He’s slowed down his case load a bit but he is a partner in his firm. It is nice to stay in touch. I have heard so many heartbreaking stories. I think mine was relatively easy compared to others. Not fun, of course, but I’ve met some strong women, including you, Caz. I guess we all have a story. Listening to those is a wonderful tool for acceptance and growth. (And not drowning!) 💜

          Liked by 1 person

  2. Kim,
    What an ordeal to have to go through! Wow. Sounds like just getting a diagnosis was a full-time job and then some! I’m so glad you’re sharing your story. I know I’m a newcomer to your blog, but I’m learning a lot and not just about fibromyalgia. While I don’t have an autoimmune disease, this past fall I suffered a several month bout of hives. I was miserable. While I was told by the allergist that it was idiopathic, my general practitioner told me that he felt that much of it was due to my stress-load. I thought I had been dealing with my stress pretty well considering, but, apparently, my body wasn’t agreeing with me. So I’ve slowly been changing the way I think about my life and how I’m dealing with things that have caused me so much stress. My therapist suggested that I think about The Serenity Prayer as I struggle. Since then, I’m learning to really hate The Serenity Prayer because I, apparently, am so bad at doing what it asks. My therapist told me that most people who struggle with it also hate it. So I guess it’s good to know I’m not the only one because I thought, who besides me hates The Serenity Prayer? Anyway, the point I’m attempting to make is that reading your blog helps me as I try and keep trying and try even more to figure all of this out. Thank you for writing, Kim. I’m so glad I found you! Mona

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Awe. Thank you dear Mona! I am a bit teary eyed. It means so much to read what you’ve written. The body will react to physical and mental issues. Hives sound about right when reacting to stress. Be sure it isn’t an allergy. The Serenity Prayer… that’s a tough one. It’s big! But it is meaningful. Hate it or love it, it’s a great goal. You could just try, letting it go-? I struggle with learning to do just one task a day, I say struggle because I know if I overdo it, my body will attack me. Sometimes it’s worth it. When it’s important. Other times it’s just getting the hives for no apparent reason! I am always an email away! I appreciate you, Mona! I’m so glad you are here. (If you hate the prayer, forget about it. It’s not an attainable goal. Life’s short, find the joy in your life everyday, it’s there if you just look for it! 💜)

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Sadly, there are so many stories like yours Kim. I wonder at all those around the world who have been beaten to the floor with fibromyalgia. It is so good to think that there is more early diagnosis and support but there are still many who never, get the support they so badly need. Thank goodness for John your lawyer, and others like him.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree Brigid. So many have terrible stories, some made it through, too many did not. I really was lucky through all of it. And I made it. This is why I write about it. I don’t relish having to think about these times, but I do want to help others understand they are never alone. Lord knows I had my ups and downs! Thanks, Brigid! 💜

      Liked by 1 person

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