The Fog of Fibromyalgia

I am presenting this post on fibromyalgia fog, as a direct response to a blogging prompt from The Fibromyalgia Blogger’s Directory. The following blog is my response to what is fibromyalgia fog? Please check out The Fibromyalgia Blogger’s Directory to see if you want to be part of this fantastic network of bloggers! Now on to my post; The Fog of Fibromyalgia…

I Tripped Over a Stone

Fibrofog

Sounds fun doesn’t it? This is a symptom that accompanies Fibromyalgia Syndrome. These episodes of fog may or may not occur with a fibro flare. If you are diagnosed with fibromyalgia you most likely will periodically experience fibro fog. I have my theory as to why we experience these fogs, but it is only a theory. Chemical imbalance? Dopamine receptors malfunctioning? Too many stimuli? Too much pain… whatever the case, check out time! You find yourself in a fog. It is frustrating because you are aware you are experiencing cognitive difficulties! A fibro fog does not increase the ever-present fibromyalgia pain but it does make managing your pain more difficult.

You search for words, you search for familiar tasks, you search your memory, in and of itself! Many people think you are drunk or on some serious illegal drugs. Walking can become a challenge, dressing looks like a clown show…

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20 comments

  1. I was in a fibromyalgia fog the past 2 days, I always find it odd no matter how many times I tell the routine people in my life that it is a reality and will happen upon occasion they always get more worried and stressed by it than I. I’ve had this long enough to know it’s ok, not a big deal, will pass eventually and I don’t get upset or worried about it. On the plus side an episode of it always gets my hubby to start making dinner lol.

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    1. I like the plus side! I think it’s distressing for others because of its randomness. Then again, I think fibro is distressing more for others than it is for the fibro sufferer! Yes, the episodes pass. We get used to them but others, no so much. My hubby jokes about them with me, says he can get away with pretty much anything and we laugh. My friends and family, not so much. Little to no understanding. I think it scares them. Thanks for commenting, Katrin! ~Kim

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  2. I have to say I am with Steve on this. It sounds similar to the MS Fog. I am extremely fatigued way too much for someone who is only 36. I do want to thank you for this great information! You my dear always provide informative info!

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  3. I LOVE your blogs and the responses/comments from others. Makes me feel inclusive and validated.
    Fibro fog. Why? What makes our brains suddenly feel like they’re trapped or wrapped in cellophane?
    I still work in the medical field and have had several professionals attempts to break this code. One was a pharmacist at hospital ER where I worked. She thought FM might be related to a type of hemophilia but the kind where our blood is too thick, clots too much, sluggish, if you will. Blood carries oxygen to vital organs-brain-and if it’s too thick, then we’re not getting organs properly oxygenated. But it’s a clotting factor that doesn’t respond to aspirin or even Coumadin, but rather, heparin.
    So, I convinced my doc to start me on Heparin 5000 subcutaneously twice day. The first dose was amazing! My fog cleared and I was cognitively myself again without the feeling of thinking while head is being filled with cement. I stayed on regimen for 45 days until my next menses which brought me close to needing transfusion once the bleeding stopped. Needless to say, my doctor wouldn’t even discuss this therapy again. There are so many theories regarding FM that have not been properly explored. Hopefully, the medical sciences will develop some real research and studies.

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    1. Hi Sherry! Thanks for being part of my Tribe and commenting and participating! Your comments count and I do hear you! Sincere thanks. How interesting about the blood clotting theory. I can’t believe your doc put you on heparin. Whoa… then almost needing a transfusion!!! I’m scared for you. Don’t do that again. You must be a mind reader. I have a post scheduled for tomorrow on my thoughts about why we experience fibro fog! But it has nothing to do with blood not reaching the brain. I agree with you- We need so much more research done on fibromyalgia!!! We deserve some concrete answers. Thanks so much for sharing this information! Everyone’s experience in invaluable towards gaining an understanding about how we handle our fibro and our fibro fog! Very informative! Thanks so much Sherry! 💜

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      1. I love that your Tribe doesn’t dwell on the symptoms without giving some sort of insight into either managing or explaining what’s going on. FM/CFS is painful, exhausting, depressing and suicidal but we all have to keep going.
        I get weary of reading research at times but there are plenty of scientific experiments at least started like the one “Sticky blood” and Antiphospholipid Syndrome and FM.
        I also have a theory about which came first: poor sleep or Fibro? When we don’t go into REM sleep, which most FMer’s don’t, our bodies are not able to slough off the “waste” from muscles used during the day, usually into the lymphatic system as lactic acid. Instead the “waste” gets piled onto if the tendons and ligaments where joints connect and becomes like scar tissue. When area is massaged, it can be broken down and then sloughed off, hence the very nauseous, dizzy feeling after a massage. I’m dealing with lot of painsomnia right now and taking a beating. Still smiling though 🙏🏻

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        1. I think it depends a lot on how you got diagnosed. I know exactly when I developed fibro. I was in a car accident. My emphasis is now on treatment and management. When you can’t pinpoint how, you definitely want answers. It is a starting point! Just like receiving the diagnosis, which on average takes 4 years, you finally have a diagnosis! A name to focus on!

          I think we could research from sun up to sundown for years and never read the same thing twice. This is why a tribe is so powerful. What you don’t know, one of your tribe does! It’s a godsend to be part of this tribe of bloggers! Some do not even have a chronic illness but are still present and care about what is going on with you! I love my tribe!

          I always caution when researching, I use the three article rule from three different sources. If something comes out about fibro, you need to be able to find the same information on three reliable sites. Like PubMed, Ovid, Web of Science, Science Direct, even Google Scholar. Reliable, fact driven and supported research. Anyone can have a theory, I have theories, but a theory isn’t supported yet by evidence when it then becomes factual information.

          There is so much information out there, flirt with the theories but rely on the evidence supported factual data! You are simply a delight to read! I love your comments, ideas, energy! Please keep me up to date and I look forward to many more spirited conversations! Yay!😊💜

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  4. Thank you, as well! I’ve not been as energized by conversation in a while. And thanks for the Three Article Rule. I’ll definitely use that in the future. I will share much more but don’t want be hog 🙂 See you!!

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